Scarlet & Grey
Ohio State University
School of Music


Music and Emotion - Schedule of Readings

The course readings will following the schedule given below. Please note: readings listed in black are required readings (everyone); readings listed in red* will be assigned to individual students (for class presentations).

Week 1: The Darwinian Tradition

Randolph Cornelius. (1996). The Science of Emotion. Chapters 1 & 2; pp. 1-57. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996. [57 pages]

V.C. Tartter, "Happy talk: Perceptual and acoustic effects of smiling on speech." Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 24-27.* [4 pages]

David Huron, Daryl Kinney & Kristin Precoda. (MS). Relation of pitch height to perception of dominance/submissiveness in musical passages. Full text [12 pages]

Required reading: 73 pages.

Week 2: The Jamesian Perspective

Randolph Cornelius. (1996). The Science of Emotion. Chapter 3; pp. 58-111. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996. [54 pages]

*Damasio, Antonio R. (1994). Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons. [267 pages]

Kate Hevner, (1936). Experimental studies of the elements of expression in music. American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 48, pp. 246-268.* [23 pages]

William Thompson and Brent Robitaille, (1992). "Can composers express emotions through music?" Empirical Studies of the Arts, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 79-89.* [11 pages]

Required reading: 88 pages.

Week 3: The Cognitivist Approach

Randolph Cornelius. (1996). The Science of Emotion. Chapter 4; pp. 112-148. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996. [36 pages]

Eduard Hanslick. (1854/1957). Vom Musikalisch-Schönen. Translated in 1891 by Gustav Cohen as: The Beautiful in Music. Chapter 1: Aesthetics as Founded on Feelings. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., pp. 7-19. [13 pages]

*Peter Kivy. (1990). Music Alone; Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience. Chapter 8: How Music Moves. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1990; ISBN: 0-8014-2331-7. pp. 146-172.

*Stephen Davies. (1994) Kivy on Auditors' Emotions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 235-236.* Peter Kivy. (1994) Armistice, But No Surrender: Davies on Kivy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 236-237.*

Peter Kivy. (1993) Auditor's Emotions: Contention, Concession and Compromise. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 1-12.* [12 pages]

Required reading: 62 pages.

Week 4: Social Constructivism

Randolph Cornelius. (1996). The Science of Emotion. Chapter 5; pp. 149-183. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996. [34 pages]

*Paul E. Griffiths, (1997) What Emotions Really Are. Chicago: Chicago University Press. [257 pages]

J. L. Briggs (1998). Never in anger: Portrait of an Eskimo family. In: Jennifer M. Jenkins, Keith Oatley, and Nancy L. Stein (Eds.) Human Emotions: A Reader. Malden, MA: Blackwell. Chapter 5. [12 pages]

Required reading: 46 pages.

Week 5: The Problem of Negative Emotions

Leonard B. Meyer. (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. Chapters 1 & 2; pp. 1-82. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1956. [82 pages]

Randolph Nesse. (1991). What good is feeling bad? The Sciences. Vol. 31, No. 6, pp. 30-37.* [6 pages]

*Jerrold Levinson. Music and negative emotion. In: Jenefer Robinson (ed.) Music and Meaning. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1997; pp. 215-241.* [27 pages]

*Stephen Davies, (1997). Why listen to sad music if it makes one feel sad? In: Jenefer Robinson (ed.) Music and Meaning. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, pp. 242-253. [12 pages]

*Colin Radford, (1989). Emotions and music: A reply to the cognitivists. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 47, No. 1, pp. 69-76.* [8 pages]

Required reading: 88 pages.

Week 6: Emotion and Expectation

Leonard B. Meyer. (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. Chapters 3 & 4; pp. 83-196. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1956. [114 pages]

*Jenny Saffran, Elizabeth Johnson, Richard Aslin & Elissa Newport. (1999). Statistical learning of tone sequences by human infants and adults. Cognition, Vol. 70, pp. 27-52. [26 pages]

*Paul von Hippel & David Huron. (2000). Why do skips precede reversals? The effect of tessitura on melodic structure. Music Perception, Vol. 18, No.1, pp. 59-85. Abstract and text. [17 pages]

*Jasba Simpson & David Huron (1994). Absolute pitch as a learned phenomenon: Evidence consistent with the Hick-Hyman Law. Music Perception, Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 267-270. Abstract and Text. [4 pages]

*David Huron (MS). Musical Expectation. [~25 pages]

Required reading: 114 pages.

Week 7: Mimesis & Performance

Leonard B. Meyer. (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. Chapter 6; pp. 197-232. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1956. [36 pages]

One additional reading too be announced.

*Manfred Clynes, Sentics: The Touch of the Emotions. New York: Doubleday, 1977. [249 pages]

Required reading: 36 pages.

Week 8: Convergence

Randolph Cornelius. (1996). The Science of Emotion. Chapters 6 & 7; pp. 184-219. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996. [36 pages]

Jeff Smith, "Movie music as moving music: Emotion, cognition, and the film score." In: Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999; pp.146-167.* [22 pages]

David Huron. A Theory of Music and Affect. Ernst Bloch Lecture, University of California, Berkeley. October 29, 1999. [40 pages]

*Alan Fridlund, (1994). Human Facial Expression. San Diego: Academic Press. [316 pages]

Required reading: 98 pages.

Week 9: The Limbic System

Randolph Cornelius. (1996). The Science of Emotion. Appendix: The Neurophysiology of Emotion, pp.220-231. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996. [12 pages]

*Joseph LeDoux, (1996). The Emotional Brain. New York: Touchstone Press. [303 pages]

Rita Carter, (1999). Mapping the Mind. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. pp. 11, 19, 34-37, 42-45, 47-51, 76, 81-86, 96, 103 [21 pages]

Required reading: 33 pages.

Week 10: Emotion and Culture

Laura-Lee Balkwill and William Thompson, (1999). A cross-cultural investigation of the perception of emotion in music: Psychophysical and cultural cues. Music Perception, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 43-64. [22 pages]*

James Averill, "It's a small world, but a large stage" (pp.143-145); Paul Ekman, "Antecedent events and emotion metaphors" (pp.146-149); Phoebe Ellsworth, "Some reasons to expect universal antecedents of emotion" (pp.150-154); Nico Frijda, "Universal antecedents exist, and are interesting" (pp.155-162); Richard Lazarus, "Universal antecedents of the emotions" (pp.163-171); Klaus Scherer, "Evidence for both universality and cultural specificity of emotion elicitation" (pp.172-175); Paul Ekman & Richard Davidson, "Afterword: How is evidence of universals in antecedents of emotion explained?" (pp.176-177). Universals in Antecedents of Emotions In: The Nature of Emotion: Fundamental Questions, P. Ekman & R.J. Davidson (eds.). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.* [34 pages]

*Sandra Trehub (2000). Human processing predispositions and musical universals. In: Wallin, Merker and Brown (Eds.) The Origins of Music. Cambridge, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press. pp.427-448. [22 pages]

*Unyk, A.M., Trehub, S.E., Trainor, L.J., & Schellenberg, E.G. Lullabies and simplicity: A cross-cultural perspective. Psychology of Music, Vol. 20, No. 1 (1992) pp. 15-28. [14 pages]

*Anna Wierzbicka. Emotion, language, and cultural scripts. In: Shinobu Kitayama & Hazel Rose Markus (eds.) Emotion and Culture: Empirical Studies of Mutual Influence. Washington: American Psychological Association, 1994. ISBN 1-56798-224-4. pp.133-196. [75 pages]

Required reading: 56 pages.

Total required reading: 689 pages (roughly 70 pages per week).



This document is available at http://csml.som.ohio-state.edu/Music829D/readings.html